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CASE REPORT
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 175-178

Atretic Coronary sinus orifice and a diverticulum of coronary sinus associated with persistent left superior vena cava and accessory pathway


1 Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
2 Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Hedieh Alimi
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcecho.jcecho_55_20

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Coronary orifice atresia and diverticula are considered rare congenital conditions. Our understanding of the coronary sinus (CS) and venous drainage anatomy plays a crucial role in performing interventions and surgical procedures required to improve treatment options and related prognosis for these patients. The case study described herein involves a 29-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with coronary orifice atresia and diverticula. The patient's electrocardiography revealed normal sinus rhythm, short PR interval, and delta wave. Transthoracic echocardiography results showed the subject also suffered from mild CS dilation associated with coronary orifice atresia and diverticula. Our clinical intervention included the use of agitated saline injection which was administered intravenously into the patient's left arm. Our clinical observations during the administration of agitated saline solution did not indicate the presence of any detectable air bubbles entering into the CS. The results of two-dimensional and color flow Doppler study showed that CS connection to the right atrium appeared to be atretic. During our examination, we were also successful in detecting a pulsatile free echo space which was connected through an isthmus to the CS. Electrophysiology study and coronary angiogram performed on the subject confirmed our clinical diagnosis and findings of CS atresia, diverticula, and left superior vena cava.


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